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Pallet Stacking in Warehouse Applications

Last post 01-18-2008, 2:42 PM by mikecj. 12 replies.
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  •  04-19-2006, 7:33 PM 166

    jeanne.walker is not online. Last active: 04-21-2006, 5:45 PM jeanne.walker



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  • Pallet Stacking in Warehouse Applications

    "Materials Handling" standard (1910.176(b)) says items "stored in tiers shall be stacked, blocked, interlocked and limited in height."  The warehouse manager says it is common practice to stack pallets of material, but not to worry about a method to block, interlock or limit in height those tiers of pallets. (I guess we are limited in height by the ceiling!) Has anyone had any experience with the way OSHA inspectors interpret this standard?  What is the best practice (since I've already been told the common practice)?
  •  04-21-2006, 11:10 AM 172 in reply to 166

    Rock_Buyer is not online. Last active: 07-27-2006, 7:47 AM Rock_Buyer



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  • Re: Pallet Stacking in Warehouse Applications

    Hi Jeanne. What kind of product are you stacking? We are in the tire business and use pallet racks to store all of our products. The pallet racks we use have iron bars mounted to them which basically form a cube. Therefore, the "blocking" is built into our pallet racks. If we were to stack tires on a flat pallet and try to stack other loaded pallets on top of it, blocking would be required because the lower tires could compress, shift or otherwise move causing everything else to come crashing down. As far as height, our storage limitation is determined by our sprinkler capacity and not by our ceiling height. I wish it were the other way, but if you're sprinkler isn't rated to put out a potential fire, then it can't be stored there. We learned this the hard way. Hope this helps.  

                                                                                                          Jack  

  •  04-21-2006, 5:43 PM 174 in reply to 172

    jeanne.walker is not online. Last active: 04-21-2006, 5:45 PM jeanne.walker



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  • Re: Pallet Stacking in Warehouse Applications

    Thanks, Jack, for replying!  We are stacking cases of consumer goods, like baking soda, laundry detergent, etc.  The specific issue is in regard to the pallets we are currently loading with cases of toothbrushes.  The tiers of boxed toothbrushes are stretch-wrapped onto the pallet (usu. 4-5 tiers high) making the individual pallet height about 4 feet high.  Then they are stacking another 4' high pallet on top of that, and so forth, until it is four pallets high (~16 to 17 feet high overall).  The pallets of product are not interlocked or blocked like your racked pallets are, which is my concern.  You're right about the sprinkler capacity, too, we have been limited to within 6 ft. of the sprinklers, e.g. in a 20 foot high room, we could only stack to 14 feet so there would be 6 feet between the stacked product and the sprinklers). The cardboard cases holding the toothbrushes are rated strong enough not to compress so that's not a concern, but the shifting or otherwise moving, like you said, is.
  •  04-28-2006, 10:59 AM 205 in reply to 174

    jdrehmer is not online. Last active: 04-28-2006, 10:59 AM jdrehmer



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  • Re: Pallet Stacking in Warehouse Applications

    Jeanne,

    We stack product very similar to you. We stack flat packaged, unassembled furniture on pallets and we stack those pallets in certaina areas of the warehouse. Most of the warehouse has racks. But we have two areas of "block stacks". We do not interlock any of it. It stacks pretty stabile.

    We limit our stacks to 16' max so as to ensure a stabile pile. This also gets us clear of the sprinkler.

    We recently underwent a wall to wall with OSHA and they had no problems with this.

    I hope that helps.

    Jeremy Drehmer

  •  05-04-2006, 6:28 PM 225 in reply to 166

    lorenam is not online. Last active: 05-04-2006, 6:28 PM lorenam



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  • Re: Pallet Stacking in Warehouse Applications

    How about when you are stacking pallets to reach up high.  Is there a standard that says something on this?  I have warehouse people who would rather step on a stack of wood pallets than use a step stool. 
  •  09-09-2006, 2:16 AM 661 in reply to 225

    USPSKAT is not online. Last active: 09-09-2006, 3:02 AM USPSKAT



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  • Re: Pallet Stacking in Warehouse Applications

    WHAT ABOUT STACKING PALLETS OF LETTER TRAYS? (U.S.P.S.) ALSO STACKING PALLETS OF SHRINK WRAPPED MAGAZINES/CATALOGS? ( THE HEIGHT OF EACH OF THESE VARIES FROM ABOUT  1 ft  INDIVIDUALLY TO 5-6 FT. SOMETIMES DOUBLE, TRIPLE STACKED OR MORE. WHERE IS THAT REGULATION WRITTEN? WHO GOVERNS THE POSTAL SERVICE SAFETY STANDARDS? DOES THE P.O. MAKE THEIR OWN RULES BECAUSE WE ARE A GOV'T/PRIVATE INDUSTRY?Tongue Tied [:S]
    USPSKAT
  •  10-16-2007, 5:22 PM 1845 in reply to 661

    mocano is not online. Last active: 09-28-2009, 5:11 PM mocano



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  • Re: Pallet Stacking in Warehouse Applications

    I am also interested in knowing what is that standard, as well as if there are any standards that regulate how high you can "block stack".  Thanks!
  •  10-17-2007, 9:52 AM 1849 in reply to 166

    6277558 is not online. Last active: 03-12-2009, 9:08 AM 6277558



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  • Re: Pallet Stacking in Warehouse Applications

    You need to refer to the NFPA regulations as well.  Whether of not you have sprinklers make a difference.

    We use wood pallets.  We are limited to no more than 6 foot high beacuse of the type of sprinkler system we have; this equals to 16 pallets.  We don't use any blocking, but it is a policy that pallets mustbe stacked flat and not standing up right.  Additionally, pallets must be stored neatly.

    When are sprinkler system was down, we had to space out the stacks by eight feet and no more than four stacks cubed together.

  •  10-17-2007, 4:29 PM 1858 in reply to 166

    mikecj is not online. Last active: 06-07-2012, 5:13 PM mikecj



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  • Re: Pallet Stacking in Warehouse Applications

    Jeanne,

    You forgot the last part of the sentence "...so that they are stable and secure against sliding or collapse." An OSHA inspector is going to look at a listing stack and say that is a hazard.

    Most corrougated boxes are coated with anti-skid agents so this should not be a problem. Finally, corrugrated boxes come with a compression rating (e.g. 75 lbs.) Exceed that and you have a potential for collapse.

  •  12-18-2007, 8:31 AM 2080 in reply to 1858

    sharic4 is not online. Last active: 06-25-2008, 9:09 AM sharic4



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  • Re: Pallet Stacking in Warehouse Applications

    Hi, Shouldn't also the question to be asked is; How high can a pallet be stacked on a pallet rack to when it should be wrapped. I have seen pallets on racks and someone bumps the rack itself with a fork lift and items fall from 12 - 30 feet high and in two cases almoet kill someone? Is there any osha regulation for that one? Again, at what height does a pallet need to be wrapped before it is stored on a pallet rack?
  •  12-18-2007, 12:52 PM 2084 in reply to 2080

    grassyknoll is not online. Last active: 12-22-2008, 5:02 PM grassyknoll



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  • Re: Pallet Stacking in Warehouse Applications

    We have recently begun inspections for OSHA VPP at our facilities and have been shoring up material storage issues. We have 500,000+ sq ft facilities and employ both rack and floor-stacking for storage of grocery products. IMHO, there are no absolutes-other than setbacks for fire codes or mfg handling requirements. You need to develop policies to mitigate hazards and then train your employees, inspect to ensure comprehension and adherence to policy and administer retraining/corrective action when policies are not followed. Why I say there are no absolutes is that ultimately we train our employees that no matter what the policy states, they are ultimately responsible to ensure that the pallets are configured within the guidelines in a safe and secure manner. We have pallets triple-stacked in excess of 20'+, and the above program was completely acceptable to Cal OSHA. With respect to pallet-wrapping, we require all pallets above 12' to be wrapped , but then we also train the employee to wrap anything lower which is unstable, we don't allow our operators to use policy as an excuse for creating a hazard.

    No matter how well crafted your programs are, if you have an inspector that wants to cite you they will under the General Duty Clause. A well though out and administered program will simply lessen that likelihood.

     

  •  01-18-2008, 8:26 AM 2191 in reply to 2080

    sharic4 is not online. Last active: 06-25-2008, 9:09 AM sharic4



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  • Re: Pallet Stacking in Warehouse Applications

    My question is simple. If you are walking down an aisle, between two pallet racks which are 18 feet in height on both sides and you have pallets on the shelves of the rack which are unwrapped all the way as high as the 18 feet. what is the osha regs till they need to be wrapped. Another words at what height dose a pallet need to be wrapped?

  •  01-18-2008, 2:42 PM 2192 in reply to 2191

    mikecj is not online. Last active: 06-07-2012, 5:13 PM mikecj



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  • Re: Pallet Stacking in Warehouse Applications

    Sharic4,

    There is no specific answer to your question. In general, I would say the answer is "when the height of the stack of pallets becomes a potential hazard." Pick a number but be able to defend your choice. You can choose some multiple of the average human's height. Personally, I would choose the height of the backstop on the forklift you are using. If I know that the pallets cannot slide back onto the cab of the forklift, I know my plant is a little safer.

    MikeCJ

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